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Health-E-News August 2015
empowering you to optimal health

 

Andy Murray Gets Adjusted Mid-Match

What did tennis star Andy Murray do during a game when he experienced shoulder pain? He called a timeout, got adjusted by his Chiropractor, and then continued playing. Andy Murray went on to win the game!

 

Sugary Drinks Linked To The Deaths Of Hundreds Annually

New research finds sugary drinks are partly responsible for the deaths of 1,600 Canadians every year.

To watch the full news report, visit our website or click here

Remember, nothing is better to drink than water.

 

Health experts have figured out how much time you should sit each day

You may want to stand up while you read this.

Experts now say you should start standing up at work for at least two hours a day - and work your way toward four. That's a long-awaited answer for a growing number of workers who may have heard of the terrible health effects of prolonged sitting and been wondering whether they should buy standing desks or treadmill desks.

Today, the average office worker sits for about 10 hours; first all those hours in front of the computer, plowing through e-mails, making calls or writing proposals, and eating lunch. And then all those hours of sitting in front of the TV or surfing the Web at home.

Medical researchers have long warned that prolonged sitting is dangerous, associated with a significantly higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and depression, as well as muscle and joint problems. According to the expert statement released in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, people should begin to stand, move and take breaks for at least two out of eight hours at work. Then, gradually work up to spending at least half of your eight-hour work day in what researchers call these “light-intensity activities."

Some ideas to ensure you stand during the work day include:

  • Standing while talking on the phone.
  • Holding standing or walking meetings.
  • Walking over to a colleague’s desk instead of sending an e-mail.
  • Using the stairs instead of the elevator.

You can read the entire article here.

 

Are your kids getting enough water?

With summer here it's important to ensure your children (and you) are drinking lots of water.

More than half of children and teenagers in the United States might not be properly hydrated, according to a nationwide study from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. In fact, 54.5% of the students in the study had urine concentrations that qualified them as below their minimum daily water intake.

"I was surprised that almost one in four kids drank no water during the course of their day," said lead author Erica Kenney, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Harvard Chan School.

Not all children and adolescents were equally dehydrated, according to the study. Boys surveyed were 76% more likely to be inadequately hydrated than girls, which was a statistically significant finding.

While mild dehydration typically isn't life threatening, not drinking enough water could result in cognitive impairment, headaches and even nausea in severe cases, according to Dr. Anisha Patel, a pediatrician at the University of California, San Francisco.

For younger children, symptoms include fussiness, infrequent urination, dry mouth and a lack of tears when the child is crying. "Keeping kids hydrated can help them with learning and to perform better in school," said Patel.

But how much water is enough? For kids and teenagers, daily water requirements vary quite a bit and depend on several factors, including age and activity level.

For total water intake, experts recommend that kids get the majority from drinking water, but also a small amount from food. Kids 1 to 3 years old need roughly four cups of drinking water daily. For kids 4 to 8, five cups is recommended a day. Once kids reach 9, the requirements differ by sex. For boys 9 to 13, eight cups of water is recommended daily, while girls need about seven cups.

"Children don't have a highly developed thirst mechanism, so they're especially vulnerable to becoming dehydrated," said Dianne Ward, a professor of nutrition in the UNC Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health and director of the Intervention and Policy Division. "So parents need to remind their children to drink water," Ward says.

All experts agreed that kids should steer clear of caffeinated and sugary beverages because these drinks contain other ingredients that don't necessarily provide nutritional benefits. Even worse, beverages with caffeine are mildly diuretic, meaning they cause the body to produce more urine. This means that caffeine could even make dehydration worse.

The experts we spoke to all had one resounding message: schools need to do a better job of providing kids access to clean drinking water, and not just during lunch time.

At home, parents can start by setting by a good example: drinking water themselves to create a "culture of hydration". Children shouldn't even have to ask for water, and younger children in child care should have clean drinking water available to them at all times.

Full Article

 

 


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